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Industry News


Mistranslation May Have Led to ISIS Abduction of Japanese Nationals
The U.S. Government’s Foreign-Language Problem
New Rules Recommended for Interpreters in Oklahoma Courts
Quebec Order of Nurses Responds to Translation Complaints
New York City to Add or Expand 40 Dual-Language Programs
More Trained Translators and Interpreters Are Needed in Africa
Minnesota’s Somali Court Interpreter in High Demand
Push for Foreign Language Education Requirement in Massachusetts
Market for Translated Fiction Is Growing, but Still Limited
Spoken languages Will Become Simpler and Less Numerous by 2115
Award to Honor Unsung Japanese Translators

ATA News


Call for Presentation Proposals: ATA 56th Annual Conference
Call for Nominations: 2015 ATA Election
Call for Mentees and Mentors: The ATA Mentoring Program
Your membership matters
More Sessions than Ever Before!
Call for Comments: ATA Board of Directors Meeting
Coming Up in the February Issue of The ATA Chronicle

Industry News
Mistranslation May Have Led to ISIS Abduction of Japanese Nationals

According to Japanese daily Nikkan Gendai, a mistranslation may have led to the death of a Japanese hostage held by ISIS. On January 17, Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe spoke in Cairo about his country’s policy of peace and coexistence in the Middle East. He described the philosophy of his government as “the best way is in the middle.” Abe then pledged $200 million in non-military humanitarian aid to countries and refugees in the region. The money, he said, was to help check the threat that ISIL poses. Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ translation was “to help curb the threat ISIL poses.” There was no Arabic translation of the speech. Three days later, ISIS (ISIL) released a video message threatening to kill two Japanese hostages unless a $200-million ransom was paid within 72 hours. In what would appear to be a direct response to Abe’s Cairo speech, the video message stated “To the prime minister of Japan: Although you are more than 8,500 kilometers (5,280 miles) from the Islamic State, you willingly have volunteered to take part in this crusade. You have proudly donated $100 million to kill our women and children, to destroy the homes of the Muslims.” While many critics laid blame for the apparent misunderstanding on the prime minister, several have questioned whether the English translation was at fault. Japanese journalist and academic Kimio Haruna is one of them. Haruna says that a more accurate translation of the prime minister’s statement would have been “to help check the threat ISIL poses.” He says that on the face of it “curb” and “check” would seem interchangeable in the context of the speech, but there is a subtle difference that becomes important in translation. “Curb” has a more forceful tone, almost combative, Haruna says. He states that when taken out of context, the statement that the financial aid was given to “curb the threat” could have been seen as aid given to fight the treat. Abe’s offer of support for healthcare, infrastructure, and jobs might just have been lost in translation.

From “Japanese Government Error May Have Two Hostages ‘Lost in Translation'”
Daily Beast (NY) (01/25/15) Adelstein, Jake; Kubo, Angela Erika

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The U.S. Government’s Foreign-Language Problem

In the years since 9/11, the U.S. government’s foreign policy efforts have been dogged by a shortage of linguists. The New York Times reports that the government often appears to be contributing to the problem rather than solving it. The Times cites a catch-22 scenario now playing out in the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). A number of the bureau’s agents, many of who were hired specifically for their foreign language and cultural background, say they are now being penalized for those same skills. The Post-Adjudication Risk Management program (PARM), put in place after the 2001 terrorist attacks, authorizes the bureau to single out “at-risk” employees—many of whom are linguists—for additional security screenings, polygraph tests, scrutiny of travel, and reviews of electronic communications. Agents say they are never told what they have done to be included in the PARM program. Even 15- and 20-year career employees with commendations for their service in counterterrorism have been placed under PARM’s increased surveillance. How to get off the PARM list, short of cutting all ties to family and friends abroad, is almost as big a mystery as how to get on. J. Mark Batts, acting section chief in the FBI Security Division, says that being in the PARM program does not indicate that the individual is a threat to the national security interests of the US. He emphatically states it does not affect career opportunities. It is meant to protect foreign-born employees, or employees with international ties, since they could be made more vulnerable to blackmail or coercion if their friends or family members overseas were threatened by terrorist groups. Agents disagree. Speaking anonymously, they say they are working under a cloud of suspicion, denied access to certain classified documents, and overlooked for the best assignments. Attempts to challenge PARM in court have failed because much of the information cannot be released because of national security risks. Dallas lawyer Bobby Devadoss, who represents several agents, says, “If you’re in this program, it keeps you from moving up. You could be a superstar agent, but if you’re in this box, you’re in the box.”

From “The U.S. Government’s Foreign-Language Problem”
The Atlantic (DC) (01/03/15) Schiavenza, Matt

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New Rules Recommended for Interpreters in Oklahoma Courts

On January 12 the Oklahoma Supreme Court adopted a proposal to establish a state certified courtroom Interpreter credential. The decision is the result of an organized campaign for a certification program that began in 2007. The certification, which will be based on the credentialing process developed by the National Center for State Courts (NCSC), will be administered by the State Board of Examiners of Certified Courtroom Interpreters. The Board states that NCSC is widely recognized by state courts as the industry standard for certification of courtroom interpreters. Under the new Oklahoma program, a Certified Courtroom Interpreter is qualified to act as a courtroom interpreter in both translation of written text and interpretation of spoken words in the language certified. The program also establishes a Registered Courtroom Interpreter classification. A Registered Courtroom Interpreter is qualified to serve as a courtroom interpreter when a Certified Courtroom Interpreter is not available. Sebastian Lantos, a member of the Oklahoma Board of Courtroom Interpreters, has been a long-time advocate for a state program to test and certify interpreters. Lantos notes that in civil cases the right to an interpreter is a state right, not a constitutional right. Therefore, he says, it’s the state’s responsibility to guarantee a qualified interpreter.

From “New Rules Recommended for Translators, Interpreters in Oklahoma Courts”
Tulsa World (OK) (12/26/14) Graham, Ginnie

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Quebec Order of Nurses Responds to Translation Complaints

Dozens of Quebec nursing students say they failed the provincial-licensing exam in September because it was poorly translated. The exam, which is written in French and translated into English, is developed by the Quebec Order of Nurses. More than 400 people signed a petition of complaint about the English translation. At the time, the Order stated it was confident in its translation process but would consult with the English-language institutions that teach nursing in the province. Chantal Lemay, spokesperson for the Order, explained, “The petition brought into light a concern from the students, and the [Order] takes this concern very seriously.” Subsequently the Order announced three changes to the exam process: a second translator will now review the English exam before it is finalized, an English-language exam prep session will be added to the Order’s conference in October, and a newsletter offering tips in English on how to prepare for the exam will be published every two months. Petition-organizer Gabriela Mizrahi said, “I’m very glad that there’s going to be a change … the whole point of this petition was to bring about change and we’ve done that.” She’s disappointed, however, that the Order did not consider those who failed the exam last fall. They will have to pay to retake the test in March or have their September exam reviewed. Also students are given only three chances to pass the test. Those who failed now have two left. After failing in the fall, Raphael Bédard says he plans to take the exam in Ontario. “I feel like I’m almost betraying my province, but I also feel betrayed. I feel like a stranger in my own province.”

From “Quebec Order of Nurses Responds to Exam Translation Concerns”
CBC News (Canada) (01/14/15) Orkeke, Shari

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New York City to Add or Expand 40 Dual-Language Programs

New York City Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña has announced that the city’s Department of Education will create or expand 40 dual-language programs for the 2015-2016 school year. The programs will cover all grades, from elementary school through high school. The initiative is supported by $1 million in federal funds, provided under Title III Language Instruction for Limited Proficient and Immigrant Students. Each participating school will receive a $25,000 grant to plan the implementation of their dual-language program. Educators say the rapid growth of U.S. dual-language and immersion programs has led to several different methods of teaching in two languages. The city will follow the 50-50 model: 50 percent of the students in each classroom will be native English speakers and 50 percent will be native speakers of a partner language. While most of the programs will be in Spanish. Japanese, Hebrew, Mandarin, French, and Haitian-Creole will also be offered. Fariña, who was an English language learner herself, emphasizes the advantages of a second language in a global economy. “It’s one thing to go out with Japanese businessmen who all speak English; it’s another thing to be able to have some dinner conversation in their language,” Fariña says. “That means you’re coming to the table with a different form of respect, a different form of acknowledgment, and people accept and honor that.”

From “New York City Education Department to Add or Expand 40 Dual-Language Programs”
New York Times (NY) (01/14/15) Harris, Elizabeth A.

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More Trained Translators and Interpreters Are Needed in Africa

In most African countries, there are not enough people or money to care for the sick. Western countries and aid agencies have done much to improve health care systems by training doctors and helping to build hospitals and donate medication. However, these agencies are starting to realize that they also need to train translators and interpreters. “The translation industry has not been appreciated much in Africa,” says Paul Warambo, director of the Nairobi office of Translators Without Borders, a global organization that seeks to help deliver humanitarian services to people in their native languages. “Hospitals know that language is a barrier, but they do not employ translators or interpreters,” he says. “Probably there’s no budget for it, or nobody cares about it.” This is a dangerous situation, since patients need to be able to understand what doctors are telling them and to read public health leaflets and instructions for medications. Warambo explains that Translators Without Borders is currently focusing on the Swahili language because it is widely spoken in several African countries. But it does not cover everyone. Lori Thicke, founder of Translators Without Borders, says that more than 1,000 languages are spoken in Africa. Thicke says that has made many Africans “incredible linguists” who can be recruited to translate medical material. “They will generally speak three to five languages, regardless of education level,” she says. “But the issue is if English is their third or fourth language, you want to make sure that any critical information gets to them in their main language–or as close to their main language as possible.” Thicke says this is why training translators and interpreters is crucial. “Most people in Africa will never see a doctor in their lives,” she says. “If you speak to someone in their own language you’re more likely to touch them, and convince them.”

From “To Make a Real Difference in Some of Africa’s Poorest Countries, We Should Train More Translators”
Public Radio International (MN) (01/21/15) Cox, Patrick

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Minnesota’s Somali Court Interpreter in High Demand

As one of only two certified Somali court interpreters in the U.S., Mascuud Xaaji’s turns down more jobs than he accepts. And he travels a lot. Much of his work is in Minnesota, the state with the largest community in the country, and Xaaji’s home. Chuck Kjos, Olmsted County Court administrator, admits that it’s difficult to keep up with the demand for Somali court interpreters. “First, you have to find somebody who’s willing to do it,” Kjos says. “Then, if they’re willing, what’s their level of proficiency? Just because you’re willing doesn’t mean you’re any good at it.” He calls Xaaji’s skill a “limited resource.” Xaaji arrived in the U.S. in 1998 without a plan other than his safety. He became a court interpreter through his job as a social worker for Olmsted County. As an immigrant himself, Xaaji says he understands the distrust and fear that Somali speakers have when entering the courtroom. “There’s a huge difference in justice between here and Somalia,” he says. “There was no justice (there). There was no due process unless you have a lot of money or a lot of (governmental) support. There is no trust in the justice system, and that’s carried over to here.” Not infrequently, Xaaji says he is looked to as a village elder, someone whose counsel would be expected. “Domestic (disturbances), other minor issues are resolved by the elders there.” It’s hard for Somalis to understand that here he’s not allowed to give any advice or opinion.” Polly Ryan, program coordinator of Minnesota’s court interpreter and language access services, says the judicial system would be dysfunctional without interpreters like Xaaji. “The money we spend on interpreters is just a drop in the bucket compared to other governmental systems,” Ryan says. “It’s not that expensive, in the grand scheme of things, to provide it. What money is spent is well-spent.”

From “Somali Court Interpreter in High Demand”
Rochester Post-Bulletin (MN) (01/14/15) Fate, Kay

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Push for Foreign Language Education Requirement in Massachusetts

Several educational groups are working to enhance foreign-language education requirements in Massachusetts. Currently, the state does not require languages other than English to be taught, and the wide disparity in foreign-language requirements and offerings is a fact of life in public schools. “There are certainly very strong programs in Massachusetts, but it’s a commitment on the part of the [local school] district,” says Nicole Sherf of the Massachusetts Foreign Language Association, a nonprofit group pushing for a state requirement for foreign-language education. Sherf says her organization is also trying to get the state legislature to create a “seal of bi-literacy” on high school diplomas to recognize students with foreign-language expertise. The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education does recommend at least two years of language courses for high school students, according to spokeswoman Jacqueline Reis. State guidelines issued in 1999 say high schoolers should become proficient in at least one language other than English, meaning that they should be able to “speak, read, write, and understand it,” she says. Following through on those recommendations, however, is solely a local decision, Reis explains. Money is another factor determining what languages students have a chance to learn. How schools decide which languages to offer can be quirky, according to Sherf. “Districts sometimes determine which [languages] to teach based on the heritage of citizens [in town] or a push from parents or a teacher in the department.” Nationally, about 16 states make foreign-language classes a requirement for high school graduation, according to Marty Abbott, executive director of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. The group is planning a public relations effort to promote foreign-language instruction as a national priority. “We’re going to try to change the mindset in the U.S. about how important languages are; English is the prestige language of the world right now, but that can change,” Abbott says. “Our country has to wake up and start realizing that for the economic competitiveness of the U.S., we have to increase our language capabilities.”

From “In Schools South of Boston, a Wide Disparity on Foreign Language Offerings”
Boston Globe (MA) (01/11/15) Seltz, Johanna

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Market for Translated Fiction Is Growing, but Still Limited

From all outward appearances, translated fiction seems to be going through a successful period in the English-speaking world. Last year saw a string of high-profile launches and impressive sales figures for works originally written in other languages. In 2013, a report by Literature Across Frontiers, a network of organizations promoting European cultural exchange, revealed that between 2000 and 2013 approximately 4.5 percent of published fiction, poetry, and drama was translated into English each year (average over three randomly selected years). However, this is still far behind the rate of foreign-language works being published in continental European countries. What’s more, the pool of countries represented in that 4.5 percent is relatively small. For example, only 22 of the books published in the U.K. and Ireland in 2008 were translations of works originally written in Arabic. There has also been much debate on the insularity and narrowness of Anglophone literature and its readers and writers. Indeed, some commentators have even warned of a slide toward homogenized, faceless literature, as western readers opt for the familiarity of the “global novel” instead of the challenges of understanding works that are distinctly local in their concerns. So what’s going on? Is it possible that Anglophone readers are growing simultaneously more open to global literature, yet more narrow in their outlook? On close inspection, much of the world literature available to Anglophone readers is rather less diverse than it might first appear. As South-Korean-born Austrian writer Anna Kim once said, authors who succeed internationally tend to be those whose work demonstrates “the right amount of foreignness.” The novelist, critic, and translator Tim Parks has written about the careful weaving of English culture into the works of Indian writers Salman Rushdie and Arundhati Roy, which, he says, ensures that western “readers need never fear they are too far from home.” Seen from this perspective, the profusion of works that need relatively little cross-cultural interpretation is less evidence of writers’ efforts to crack the global market than a reflection of life as it is lived in many parts of the world. Yet they should not be mistaken for the full story. Beyond the online bestseller lists are many other narratives: books that take readers away from what they know, challenge the assumptions that underpin life elsewhere, and present a strikingly different world.

From “How Books Get Lost in Translation”
Financial Times (United Kingdom) (01/16/15) Morgan, Ann

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Spoken languages Will Become Simpler and Less Numerous by 2115

John H. McWhorter, author of The Language Hoax, predicts that there will be vastly fewer languages by 2115. Languages at that time will also be less complicated than they are today–especially in how they are spoken as opposed to how they are written. McWhorter, who teaches linguistics at Columbia University, says “it’s possible that only about 600 languages will be left on the planet, as opposed to 6,000 languages today.” English and Japanese will be fine, but languages spoken by smaller groups will have a difficult time. McWhorter says this is because it is easy for speakers to associate more frequently used languages with opportunity and less frequently used languages with backwardness, and therefore to stop speaking the ones less used to their children. But unless the language is written, once a single generation no longer passes it on, it is all but lost. There are diligent efforts to keep various endangered languages from dying, but McWhorter feels that these are unlikely to lead to communities teaching these languages to their children. “Instead, many communities will create new versions of the languages, with smaller vocabularies and more streamlined grammars,” he says. Modern population movements are now creating a wave of language streamlining. In cities worldwide, children of immigrants speaking many different languages are growing up speaking a version of their new country’s language that nibbles away at such arbitrary features as irregular verbs and gendered objects. “This is a kind of compromise between the original version of the language and the way their parents speak it,” McWhorter explains. Linguists have no single term yet for these new speech varieties, but the world is witnessing the birth of lightly optimized versions of old languages. McWhorter says this streamlining should not be taken as a sign of decline. All of the “optimized” languages will remain full languages in every sense of the term. McWhorter hopes that the languages lost will at least be described and, with modern tools, recorded for posterity. “We may regret the eclipse of a world where 6,000 different languages were spoken as opposed to just 600, but there is a silver lining in the fact that ever more people will be able to communicate in one language that they use alongside their native one,” he says.

From “What the World Will Speak in 2115”
Wall Street Journal (NY) (01/03/15) McWhorter, John H.

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Award to Honor Unsung Japanese Translators

Several leading Japanese literary translators have initiated a crowdfunded effort to honor those responsible for some of the finest foreign works published in Japanese. The Best Translation Award will honor works published in 2014. It was started by Ken Nishizaki, an author and anthropologist known for translating the works of Virginia Wolf, Edgar Allan Poe, and Ernest Hemingway. Four other renowned translators will serve as judges: Motoyuki Shibata, Sachiko Kishimoto, Mizuhito Kanehara, and Miho Matsunaga. The project is unusual in that it is financed via a crowdfunding website. Other literary awards tend to have the backing of publishers or local governments. The group started raising funds for the award at the beginning of December and within only one day managed to raise more than twice their target goal. The group states that it now has raised enough to run the contest for four years. There are several award categories. Translators can be nominated for their literary translations, but also for anything from science fiction to music lyrics, Nishizaki explains. Fan publications and electronic books are also eligible, and the original works can be in any language. There may be some exclusions: specialist and academic books might be difficult to evaluate. The only translations that will not be considered are those penned by the judges themselves. Nishizaki says the project may help boost interest in foreign literature, the popularity of which has faded in recent years. This tendency has also been observed in the film and music industries. He says that only some of the Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling have made the Japanese bestseller lists in recent years. “We would like to continue this project for at least a decade, since there is no budgetary constraint involved, as the project is not sponsored externally,” Nishizaki says. “We also hope to get people interested in new authors and their works.” The winner will be announced in April.

From “Award to Honor Unsung Japanese Translators”
Japan Times (Japan) (01/06/15)

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ATA News

Call for Presentation Proposals: ATA 56th Annual Conference

The American Translators Association is now accepting presentation proposals for ATA’s 56th Annual Conference in Miami, Florida (November 4-7, 2015). Proposals must be received by March 2, 2015.

How to Submit a Presentation Proposal for 2015

The ATA Annual Conference draws an audience of 1,500 attendees, bringing together translators, interpreters, educators, language services company owners, and project managers. Making a presentation to such a diverse audience is an excellent strategy to gain recognition as a leader and expert in your field.

What is the ATA Annual Conference?

Submissions are invited from all areas of translation and interpreting, including finance, law, medicine, literature, science and technology, education and training, terminology, independent contracting, and business management. Sessions may be language specific or general.

What were the presentations like in 2014?

Think you couldn’t possibly prepare a proposal to present? Think again. ATA’sHow to Write a Winning ATA Conference Proposal webinar delivers step-by-step instructions. Common pitfalls? Winning proposal style? Presentation tips? This free 60-minute webinar has it all!

How to Write a Winning ATA Conference Proposal

You do not need to be an ATA member to submit a proposal. If you know someone who would make a great presenter, please encourage them to submit today!

Call for Nominations: 2015 ATA Election

The 2015 Nominating and Leadership Development Committee is pleased to call for nominations from ATA’s membership to fill the positions of president-elect, secretary, and treasurer (each a two-year term), as well as three directors’ positions (each a three-year term). Elections will be held at the Annual Meeting of Voting Members on Thursday, November 5, 2015, in Miami, Florida. Any ATA member may make a nomination using the online nominations forms

The deadline for submitting nominations is March 1, 2015.

Call for Mentees and Mentors: The ATA Mentoring Program

Need to move your business forward? Have questions about technology, management, or clients? The ATA Mentoring Program may be just what you need.

The program matches 30 mentees with mentors who can help them reach their specific goals. The one-year mentorship has proven to be invaluable to both the mentor and mentee. Take advantage of this ATA member benefit!

Applications from interested mentees and mentors will be accepted through March 7.

A competitive review process will be used to select the participants. This is the only enrollment period for 2015.

Want to know how the program works? Watch the ATA Mentoring Program webinar. It’s only 60 minutes and it’s free!

Your membership matters

Staying connected to colleagues, keeping up with technology, learning new business management strategies—the advantages of an ATA membership provide an excellent return on your investment.

If you haven’t renewed your membership for 2015, take time to do it now. Let ATA continue to be your most important professional resource.

More Sessions than Ever Before!

Couldn’t attend the ATA Annual Conference in Chicago? Consider buying the online eConference—177 sessions available on demand.

This year’s eConference features:
• 177 sessions—that’s 203 hours!
• Unlimited online access
• Webinar-style format
• Handouts and support material

What presentations were recorded?
» Click for preconference seminars
» Click for sessions by language
» Click for sessions by specialty
» Click for Tool Trainings

Earn ATA Continuing Education points!
One continuing education point for each hour viewed (maximum 10 points)

Call for Comments: ATA Board of Directors Meeting

Do you have something to say? This is the time to tell the Board! What are we doing right? How can we improve? What programs or services would you like to see ATA offer?

Past comments have led to great things, including the online ATA Chronicle. Member feedback counts!

The next ATA Board of Directors meeting is in Phoenix, Arizona (February 6-8). Don’t wait to think about how to word it. Just tell us what you think!

Click to select a Board member and send your comments in an email.

Coming Up in the February Issue of The ATA Chronicle

How Does the ATA Nomination Process Work?
Why is ATA interested in leadership development for its Board and potential future candidates? (ATA Nominating and Leadership Development Committee)

Reaching Out to the Advanced Placement Classroom: ATA’s School Outreach In Action
This year’s ATA School Outreach Award went to Jenny Stillo, a Spanish interpreter and translator based in Crested Butte, Colorado. Jenny’s winning picture highlighted her May School Outreach presentation to an advanced placement Spanish class at Crested Butte Community School. (Birgit Vosseler-Brehmer)?

Term Extraction: 10,000 Term Candidates–Now What? Extracting terms is easy. Identifying the right terms and names from a long list is not. Here are 10 criteria for project managers preparing a translation project.(Barbara Inge Karsch)

Anatomy of an ATA Conference
An interview with David Rumsey, ATA president-elect and conference organizer. (Jennifer Guernsey)

Interview with a Game Localizer
Alain Dellepiane discusses what it takes to make it in the exciting field of game localization. (Marta Chereshnovska)

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